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Third Quarter Earnings – What Could Dislodge Wireless?

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Greetings from Charlotte, North Carolina (picture is, from left, Frank Cairon, formerly of Verizon Wireless and Ryan Barker, currently with Verizon Wireless enjoying some good Mexican food on Friday in the Queen City with yours truly).

 

This week’s TSB examines the short-term dynamics that could impact wireless growth in the third quarter and through the end of the year.  At the end of this week’s TSB we will also briefly examine the current state of litigations and investigations active and pending (T-Mobile/ Sprint, Facebook, and Google).

 

Follow-up to Last Week’s CBRS article

 

federated wireless logoBefore diving into earnings drivers, a quick shout out to Federated Wireless, who raised $51 million this week in a mammoth C Round financing (full announcement here).  Existing investors American Tower, Allied Minds, and GIC (Singapore sovereign wealth fund) all participated in the round, and Pennant Investors (Tim McDonald, formerly of Eagle River (Craig McCaw), will be joining the Federated board) and SBA joined with fresh cash.  Kudos to Federated CEO Iyad Tarazi for his continued leadership and perseverance.  With $51 million in additional cash, spectrum sharing gets a global boost.

 

In addition to this news, the FCC also has placed the approval and scheduling of the Private Access License auction (this is the dedicated band that gets priority over the General Authorized Access band) on the docket for June 2020 (FCC Commissioner Pai’s blog post is here).  It’s generally assumed that this means a C-Band auction will come at the end of 2020/ beginning of 2021 (although this week’s news that Eutelsat has withdrawn from the C-Band Alliance has some believing that there may be a side deal afoot).  The PAL auction timeline is in line with expectations, and it’s likely participants will include some new(ish) entrants.

 

Third Quarter Earnings – What Could Dislodge Wireless?

Speaking of expectations, there’re not a lot of dramatic changes expected in the wireless arena.  Consensus has T-Mobile leading the postpaid phone net additions race (no surprise), with Sprint struggling to keep pace, AT&T in the 0-300K range for postpaid phone thanks in large part to FirstNet gains, and Verizon, excluding cable MVNO revenues, growing their retail postpaid phone base only slightly.  With the exception of FirstNet (and a few quarters of decent Verizon growth), this is a pretty consistent story dating back to early 2017.  What events could change the equation and dislodge the current structure?

 

  1. More rapid AT&T postpaid phone net additions led by FirstNet. Here’s how AT&T CFO John Stephens summarized the relationship between spectrum rollout and FirstNet deployments at an investor conference in early August:

 

We had some AWS-3 and some WCS spectrum that we had, so to speak, in the warehouse that we hadn’t deployed. We had 700 spectrum, Band 14 from FirstNet, which the government was requiring us to deploy. And then we got a whole new set of technologies that were coming out, 256 QAM and 4-way MIMO and carrier aggregation. They were particularly important to us because of our diverse spectrum portfolio. So we got the FirstNet contract and we had to touch a tower, have to go out on the network. And we decided, with this contract, now is the time to, so to speak, do everything. Put all the spectrum in service, that’s the 60 megahertz. In some towers, it’s 50, some towers, it’s 60, but it’s 60 megahertz of new spectrum that was generally unused that we’re putting in.

 

This has the effect of increased costs, but also improved network performance.  With 350,000 net additions already from FirstNet (Stephens disclosed this in the same conference), it’s entirely possible that they could post a 100K net add surprise due to increased coverage and deployments.  In turn, improved wireless bandwidth, while driving up costs, should lower churn in areas like Detroit (RootMetrics overall winner in a tie with Verizon – first since 2012), and Boston (first RootMetrics overall win in Bean Town since 2017).

 

  1. Faster cable MVNO growth. While this week’s news was on Altice’s aggressive $20 unlimited price point for existing customers (great analysis on their strategy here), both Charter and Comcast see a lot of mover activity in the third quarter.  This would seem to be a very good time to present their wireless offer.  Here’s a chart of net additions by both Charter and Comcast for the past two years:

cable mobile net additions trend chart

While the two largest cable providers accounted for ~390K growth in 2Q (and over 1.3 million net additions growth over the last four quarters), there’s a strong likelihood that this figure could grow even greater as the attractiveness of the wireless bundle pricing takes effect.   Both Spectrum and Comcast are maturing their service assurance processes, and those efforts should lower churn.

 

Comcast also made a number of changes to their “By the Gig” plans which encourage this option for multi-line plans that use 2-6 Gigabytes per line per month (and therefore use a lot of Xfinity Wi-Fi services).  It basically amounts to a prepayment for overage services, but could be attractive for certain segments/ demographics (full details on these offer changes are here).  Charter did not follow the Comcast changes described in the link and their “By the Gig” pricing continues to be $2/ mo / gigabyte higher.

 

Both Comcast and Charter are running into Apple iPhone announcement headwinds if next week’s headlines meet expectations (no 5G, no CBRS, no special financing deals, better camera).  If the changes do not increase willingness to upgrade/ change to an iPhone, it’s going to be very difficult to craft a cable plan (even $20/ mo.) that will buck the trend.  The upgrade cycle will be extended to 4Q 2020, when both the carriers and Comcast/ Charter will have full access to 5G.

 

Our prediction is that Charter and Comcast will have 475-500K net additions in the third quarter thanks to a combination of lower churn and higher gross additions (led by increased moving activity).  Altice’s offer will add another 70K net additions in September, with those gains coming from Sprint retail and, to a lesser extent, T-Mobile retail and wholesale (Tracfone).

 

  1. T-Mobile’s 600 MHz coverage (and gross add) improvements. As T-Mobile, Sprint, and the state Attorneys General try to find a resolution to their quagmire, T-Mobile keeps on deploying 600 MHz spectrum.  Here’re their reported (through Q2 2019) and estimated (Q3/Q4) progress:

t-mobile 600 MHz chart

Every new device on the T-Mobile.com website (and every T-Mobile store) is 600 MHz/ LTE Band 71 capable.  Many older devices are not, however, and that is preventing greater market share gains in secondary and tertiary geographies (many/ most BYOD Android devices from AT&T, for example, will have the 700 MHz but not have the 600 MHz band).  The expected Apple announcement represents a slight headwind for T-Mobile as well.

There’s a natural gross add/ upgrade path that follows 145 million coverage growth over a 12-month period.  Assuming T-Mobile keeps their churn rate at 0.8%/ month over 3Q (2.4% of the ending branded postpaid 2Q base would be ~1.07 million disconnections), they have grown their 600 MHz marketable base by 20 million from Q1 to Q2 and by another 50 million from Q2 to Q3.  If they just grew their penetration in the 600 MHz band by 1.5% for Q1-Q3 incremental POPs (or 0.5% penetration for the entire estimated 3Q 2019 footprint), they would negate the entire estimated branded postpaid churn for the rest of the country.  This ex-urban/ rural growth opportunity is unique to T-Mobile and would at the expense of AT&T and Verizon.

Offsetting the 600MHz growth is small cell progress.  T-Mobile committed at the beginning of the year to deploy 20,000 incremental small cells in 2019, but that guidance was withdrawn in their Q2 Factbook with H1 growth of only 1,000.  That leaves a very large backlog of in-process capital (excluding capitalized interest, total capital spending was $3.48 billion vs an estimated spending range at the high end of $5.4 – $5.7 billion).  T-Mobile should spend at least $2.2 billion in capital spending in the second half of 2019 on 5G, 600 MHz, and other initiatives and will undoubtedly be left with a lot of in-process small cell deployments.

 

  1. Sprint’s prepaid and postpaid churn. There’re a lot of headwinds for Sprint in the third quarter – overall 2Q churn trends are higher than previous year’s, and no one expects the seasonal respite to last long.  It’s likely that 3Q postpaid churn could exceed 1.85%, led by postpaid phone churn of a similar level (look for late September promotional activity).

 

Prepaid churn is a bit tougher to forecast and will also be tracked closely.  If the postpaid churn comes in below 2Q levels, check the prepaid recategorizations to postpaid (they were 116K in Q2 and 129K in Q1).  Both prepaid and reclassified postpaid accounts will be transferred to Dish assuming the merger goes through, but it makes the postpaid headline number more palatable.

 

The 30-day guarantee promotion, according to most reports, has been an ineffective switching tool.  (Sprint’s 5G rollout success has been much more impactful).  Expect Sprint to say very little until there is clarity on the litigation, and to post greater than expected losses in prepaid subscribers as they preserve their marketing dollars for a post-merger world.

 

Litigation Tracker:  Why the Facebook, Google, and T-Mobile/ Sprint cases are not all the same

Speaking of litigation and investigation, we were very dismayed that media sources are choosing to lump the New York-led Facebook investigation announced Friday, the to be announced Texas-led Google investigation, and the on-going T-Mobile/ Sprint (TMUS/S) litigation into one mega-story.  While there are some similarities, the upcoming Google action is broader than Facebook and more bipartisan than the TMUS/S complaint.

As most of you who are following the TMUS/S suit know, the states of Oregon and Illinois recently joined the original 14 states and the District of Columbia to block the merger.  (As an aside, Fox Business is reporting that the state AG group is focusing on the inexperience and shaky financial condition of Dish Networks as opposed to what would have been an uphill market concentration battle).  In fact, in the original TSB concerning the lawsuit (here), we were surprised by the absence of Illinois.  The figure below shows who is involved in what (underlined states are named in the Facebook litigation):

litigation tracker chart

To recap, there are 40 states + the District of Columbia named in the National Association of Attorneys General comment letter to the FTC (filing here), and at least 30 of them are joining a Texas-led lawsuit against Google to be announced early this week.

The makeup of the states in the FTC letter is very bipartisan:  14 Republican and 26 Democrat attorneys general.  All of the states involved in the TMUS/S litigation are also named in the FTC comment letter.  To contrast, of the 17 states in the TMUS/S litigation, only Texas (AT&T HQ) is Republican and the other 16 are Democrat.

As we stated in the TSB on the AG lawsuit, very few sparsely-populated states, regardless of political affiliation, are participating in the T-Mobile/ Sprint litigation.  Fourteen of the fifteen least densely populated states in the US (data here) are named in the Google/ FTC letter.  However, only two of the fourteen (Colorado, Oregon) are participating in the TMUS/S litigation.  The promise of a rural solution outweighs the benefits of a fourth carrier in metropolitan and suburban areas.

The Facebook investigation is also widely bipartisan with five Democrats and four Republican states represented.  Florida is involved in the Facebook investigation but none of the other two legal activities.  In addition, there are nine states (including New Jersey, a Democrat stronghold) that are not currently participating in any legal activity.

Bottom Line:  Concerns about Google’s anti-competitive practices are supported by a large number of state Attorneys General and are very bipartisan.  A subsegment of Democrat AGs (and TX) is also a part of the T-Mobile/ Sprint lawsuit.  And an even smaller subsegment plus Florida is a part of the recently announced Facebook investigation.

Next week, we will highlight some wireline trends and talk about overall profitability across the telecommunications sector.  Until then, if you have friends who would like to be on the email distribution, please have them send an email to sundaybrief@gmail.com and we will include them on the list.

 

Have a terrific week… and GO CHIEFS!

Deeper: CBRS – Share and Share Alike

cbrs top 10 slide

The following articles provide a good overview of CBRS.  There are a lot of things changing with CBRS each day, and we will be sure to keep the list updated as new developments occur.

  1. One of the best government sites is the NTIA CBRS page here. Included in this is the original NTIA October 2010 Fast Track Report cited in this week’s TSB
  2. The FCC Report and Order on CBRS from 2015 is here.
  3. This Ruckus on-line tutorial is a terrific place to start if you need a 20-minute high level overview of CBRS.
  4. The CBRS Alliance has a page devoted to certified devices that is updated frequently. The latest certified devices are here.
  5. Light Reading had a recent article summarizing AT&T’s, US Cellular’s and Verizon’s outdoor interests. It’s here.
  6. Charter’s SVP Technology Craig Cowden’s address at MCWA in 2018 is here (20 min). A good summary of the value of CBRS to the cable industry.  Charter’s FCC application for their CBRS tests is here.
  7. Adam Koeppe’s June interview with RCR Wireless concerning 5G, CBRS, MIMO, Beamforming and more is here. The Light Reading article referenced in the TSB is here.
  8. A good summary of MIdCo’s 2018/ 2019 trial with Telrad and Federated Wireless from Fierce Wireless is here.
  9. Telecompetitor interview with Federated Wireless CEO Iyad Tarazi is here. In this article, Iyad describes Federated’s role in the Kinetic Edge Alliance, which we ran out of time to discuss and is a very interesting intersection point between computing, proximity, and network sharing.  More on that group here.

UPDATED – Deeper: The Apple Card – A Wolf in (Titanium) Sheep’s Clothing?

apple card examples

 

The following articles provide a good overview of the Apple Card and the possible role it could play in the disintermediation of traditional wireless carrier phone payments.  Please note:  This is an emerging trend and not a “done deal” and it’s likely that this thread will be updated several times in the next few months.  Look for more when Apple launches their next generation of iPhones, likely in September:

  1. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) report on the state of the consumer credit market is discussed in this week’s TSB. Very useful information, although it’s a bit dated (2016).   Link to full report is in the article and also here.
  2. Link to the actual announcement of the Apple Card last March is here. Apple Pay/ Apple Card discussion starts at 23:59.
  3. CNBC article from August 9 describing the fact that Apple was offering the Apple Card to as many current Apple users as possible. Goldman Sachs is applying many learnings from their Marcus (consumer banking) product to make the Apple Card as broad as possible.
  4. Ken Segall’s blog post “The Ghost of Apple Card Past” that is referenced in TSB is here.
  5. Bloomberg article that explores Apple Card’s Terms and Conditions and reports that Apple may have additional financing options in mind with this product.
  6. Wall Street Journal review of the Apple Card (detailed and thorough). A subscription may be required.
  7. To get an idea of where Apple Card could go, have a look at the current My Best Buy financing options. Remember – Best Buy is not a manufacturer – Apple should be able to provide even better offers.
  8. Mastercard CEO Craig Vosburg CNBC interview on the Apple/ Goldman Sachs/ Mastercard relationship is here.
  9. CNBC article quoting yours truly as well as Craig Moffett on the impact the card could have on the carrier community is here.

UPDATED: Deeper – The State Attorneys General Make Their Case

** Updated to include Chairman Pai’s press release **

The following nine articles serve as a good primer for the upcoming Attorneys General case against T-Mobile/ Sprint (we will add additional articles as they are suggested/ discovered):

  1. Original complaint filed by ten Attorneys General (nine states and DC) in mid-June. Note: most of the details of Dish’s involvement were not known at the time of publication
  2. An Economic Analysis of the T-Mobile/ Sprint Merger presented to the US House Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law by Scott Wallsten. This is a true “balls and strikes” analysis
  3. Attorney General of Texas announcement that they were joining the T-Mobile/ Sprint merger complaint
  4. Bi-partisan letter from the Attorneys General of New Mexico (D) and Utah (R) to the US Senate Subcommittee on Antitrust explaining why they support the merger (hint: density matters). Their joint blog post on the topic reiterates the same points and is here
  5. New York Law Journal article reiterating the arguments that are made in the 9-state (+ DC) complaint
  6. The Electronic Frontier Foundation comments on the use of the Herfindahl Index concentration as the basis for rejecting the T-Mobile/ Sprint merger
  7. American Enterprise Institute analysis of the use of counterfactuals when considering the T-Mobile/ Sprint merger
  8. Former FCC Commissioner Robert McDowell: Blocking the T-Mobile/ Sprint merger is a “Fool’s Errand” (Bloomberg interview here).
  9. Oregon joins the lawsuit (but the NY Attorney General announces it) on August 12.  
  10. The FCC Chairman’s announcement that he is circulating a draft Order to approve the merger.

The State Attorneys General Make Their Case

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Greetings from Charlotte, North Carolina (Uptown signpost pictured).  We will attempt to answer the question “Do the state Attorneys General have a case?” by summarizing and analyzing their case (find a copy of the complaint here – see point 7).

Following the ebullience of DOJ approval and a very strong earnings report from T-Mobile, investors digested Verizon’s (generally strong for wireless, and weak relative to AT&T for wireline) and Sprint’s (generally weak, Free Cash Flow negative) earnings.  We will weave some recent earnings results into this week’s TSB, but, if you want all the details and analysis, look to the Deeper post we will have on the website related to “State Attorneys General Make Their Case”

Let’s dig into the basics of the case by understanding the plaintiffs, the nature of the complaint, and possible remedies/ compromises.

 

Who is Suing?

For those of you who are not following recent events closely, fourteen states and the District of Columbia are filing suit to permanently block the merger of T-Mobile and Sprint.  Those states are as follows:

state attorneys general information table

*Note: US population density is ~92.6 and estimated median HH income $60,366.  Sources:  Wikipedia, World Population Review

 

There is a very good balance of incumbent telcos represented by the suing states and DC.states joining the t-mobile complaint as of aug 4  In fact, outside of Texas (let no one forget it’s the HQ of AT&T), there’s really no representation of the former Bell South or Southwestern Bell territories.  It is interesting that 11 out of the 15 states or territories have a population density that is higher than the national average (the promise of rural buildout is less attractive in these areas than in Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming, Oklahoma or the Dakotas).  And there are some notable dense areas that are missing:  New Jersey, Rhode Island, Delaware and Florida all have high population densities but have not joined the group.   Florida and New Jersey split cable coverage between Comcast and Spectrum.

While the plaintiffs in the lawsuit make an argument that competition will raise prices and reduce choices for lower-income Americans, it’s interesting to note that 11 out of the 15 states have high median household income (with 7 of the top 10 household income states represented).  In fact, 12 out of the lowest 13 per household income states are not party to the complaint.

state attorneys general political party affiliationThe head-scratcher on this list is Colorado, home to Dish (admittedly not as much in the picture when the lawsuit was filed in mid-June) and a relatively less dense area.  But it also happens to be home to a significant and growing base of Comcast, Spectrum, and CableLabs employees and is one of the fastest growing states in the country.  And, as the nearby chart shows, Colorado has a Democrat Attorney General (profile here).

What isn’t a surprise is that 11 out of 15 states have a strong Comcast presence.  Admittedly, Comcast is pretty much everywhere (see map from Broadband Now here), and Illinois

(Comcast is primary provider to Chicago), Washington (Seattle, Tacoma), Georgia (Atlanta), Florida (Miami) and Pennsylvania (Comcast’s home state as well as provider in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh) are not currently represented in the legal action.  But if we see others join the lawsuit next week, don’t be surprised if they are one of the five mentioned above (Washington would be a particular blow to T-Mobile whose HQ are in Bellevue).

Bottom line:  There are 26 states with a Democrat Attorney General, and half of them have joined together to block the T-Mobile/ Sprint merger.  The one Republican state that recently joined the lawsuit happens to be home to T-Mobile’s former proposed merger partner and current competitor, AT&T.  While there is no clear pattern beyond political affiliation, it is interesting to note that Comcast/ Xfinity Mobile has a major presence in many of the suing states.

 

What’s Their Case? 

The case is best summed up in the last section (104) of the complaint: “Unless enjoined, the Merger likely will have the following effects in retail mobile wireless telecommunications services across the nation, among others:

  1. “Actual and potential competition between Sprint and T-Mobile will be eliminated;
  2. “Competition in retail mobile wireless telecommunications will be lessened substantially;
  3. “Prices for retail mobile wireless telecommunications services are likely to be higher than they otherwise would be;
  4. “The quality and quantity of mobile wireless telecommunications services are likely to be less than they otherwise would; and
  5. “Innovation will likely be reduced.”

Simply put, the telecom marketplace is better off with the current four-company structure, warts and all, then it would be with a three-company structure and Dish as a new entrant (with Sprint’s 800 MHz spectrum).  The complaint contends that prices would rise 17-20% as the new T-Mobile would exercise their dominant position in major metropolitan areas such as New York and Los Angeles to keep prices (particularly prepaid) high.  It also contends that fewer MVNOs would emerge and current MVNOs like Tracfone/ Straight Talk (20 million total customers) would struggle because neither the new T-Mobile nor Dish would make 4G or 5G capacity available at attractive prices.  Finally, they contend that the consequences for the new T-Mobile failing to fulfill their deployment promises to the FCC are too weak.

While the actual market shares are redacted in the complaint, the Herfindahl Index information and the disclosure that the new T-Mobile would have more than 50% market share in the New York and Los Angeles CMAs (see sections 48 and 49 in the complaint) is astounding (full map of the FCC CMAs and RSAs here).  CMA 1 and 2 are not small geographic areas, and, as we discussed last week, Dish owns some additional 600 MHz spectrum covering CMA 1.  The greater question is “If true, what have AT&T and Verizon been doing in these markets for the last seven years?  Have they been retreating to the Connecticut and New Jersey suburbs (as Long Island is covered by CMA 1)?”  The disclosure is damning to Verizon and AT&T as it represents their two largest facilities-based (incumbent telco) footprints.

Paterson NJ example mapAs for the argument that low-income subscribers would be disproportionately impacted, let’s have a look at the map of “mobile phone shops” in Paterson, NJ (I had the opportunity to tour every one of these and a few more as a part of my MVNO education in 2017).  As you can see from the nearby picture, there are 17 stores within a 12 square block radius selling every major carrier.  There’s a Boost City and two Boost Mobile stores.  There’s a Total Wireless (Tracfone MVNO served exclusively by Verizon) and AT&T, Verizon FiOS, T-Mobile and Sprint retail stores in the mall at the bottom of the picture.  There are traditional bodega-style shops selling H2O (AT&T MVNO), Ready Mobile (Tracfone MVNO served by T-Mobile), Ultra Mobile (T-Mobile MVNO) and several other brands.

Competition would suffer if T-Mobile eliminated their MVNO business entirely, but there’s absolutely no indication that they would ever throw Tracfone to the curb (their recent earnings call language backs it up).  But if they did, AT&T (Cricket) and Verizon (Total Wireless, Xfinity Mobile, Spectrum Mobile) would gladly take their customers.

If space permitted, there’s an argument to be made that if Apple’s new credit card is successful (see latest Bloomberg article here), the concept of device financing through a traditional carrier will be a thing of the past in several years and we will be ordering iPhones with Mint Mobile-like online plans.  Traditional carrier stores will go the way of bank branches (minus the need for an ATM).

Bottom line:  The case sounds strong, but there’s plenty of contrary evidence indicating that the new T-Mobile would not behave like AT&T and Verizon just because it is bigger.  The Herfindahl Index results highlight the metro retreat of the larger established brands more than the growing domination of their smaller rivals.

 

Let’s Make a Deal!

If a settlement can be achieved, it could include the following:

  1. Additional wireless subscriber divestitures in high-concentration markets to Dish.  That’s a “sleeves off the vest” give on the part of new T-Mobile if they believe that they can win those customers back (T-Mobile’s postpaid monthly phone churn was extremely low this quarter at 0.78%).  It may be easier to divest existing Sprint subscribers.
  2. Force a better MVNO deal for Dish (which would likely delay their construction of a replacement network).
  3. Mandate “cost plus” roaming rates T-Mobile offers to other carriers who wish to use the new T-Mobile network in rural areas (another “sleeves off the vest” argument which would improve scale for T-Mobile).
  4. Accelerate the Dish network deployment timeline (which would need to happen separately as Dish is not a party to the state Attorney’s General complaint) with additional penalties for non-compliance.
  5. Providing Dish (or near-Dish) terms to any new or existing MVNO that wishes to use the new T-Mobile network for the next 7 years (including the ability for any MVNO to exercise core control as outlined in the complaint).  This would increase T-Mobile’s overall scale but not improve Dish’s overall competitiveness.
  6. Significantly higher penalties should T-Mobile not comply with the FCC conditions.
  7. Additional commitments (including cash payments) to the states.  These might include requiring all new devices sold by new T-Mobile to be compatible with all other carriers, establishing a neutral-party run device compatibility database that would allow current and prospective customers to determine whether their current device could deliver a better network experience, and tools to make it easier to bring all text messages and voicemails to carriers should the customer leave the new T-Mobile.

Rather than focusing on the higher market share that the new T-Mobile will have (which has changed dramatically since 2012), the Attorneys General should focus on how to provide incentives to Verizon and AT&T to reestablish their presence in urban areas.

Bottom line:  There’s a deal to be made.  Rather than run the court through 5G cost models and timelines, the new T-Mobile executives and state officials should create a framework which will result in greater citywide competition and hasten the deployment of tomorrow’s network.

Next week’s issue will summarize 2Q earnings and look at Verizon’s new unlimited pricing plans.  If you would like a copy of either the Top 10 Trends or the IoT Basic presentation discussed in last week’s TSB, please let us know at the email below and we’ll get you a copy.

Until then, if you have friends who would like to be on the email distribution, please have them send an email to sundaybrief@gmail.com and will include them on the list.

Have a terrific week!

UPDATED: Deeper – “Soon… Soon” and “Playing Charlie’s Hand” (Top 11 Documents Pertaining to the T-Mobile/ Sprint Merger and DOJ/Dish Agreement)

Updated to include a lengthy interview of Marcelo Claure by David Faber (new #10).

These 11 documents (in no particular priority order) will provide the best background on the T-Mobile/ Sprint merger and the corresponding Dish/ DOJ agreement.  Note: this list will be updated to include the Sprint earnings release which is due on Friday, August 2.

As always, welcome your thoughts and feedback.  The Deeper posts are web exclusives, but if you are interested in receiving TSB by mail, please send a request to sundaybrief@gmail.com

  1. The original T-Mobile/ Sprint earnings announcement page. This has the original webcast, press release and presentation.
  2. The S-4 document filed with the SEC in July 2018 (shareholder approval document).
  3. The Dish 8-K released on Friday July 26 outlining the terms of their agreement with the DOJ.
  4. Dish also released their quarterly earnings on Monday July 29. The link to the 10-Q is here and SeekingAlpha transcript is here.
  5. Dish’s Q&A with Mike Dano of Light Reading that was posted on the evening of Friday, July 26.
  6. The T-Mobile earnings call (moved to Friday) video as well as SeekingAlpha transcript.
  7. The redacted transcript of the 13-state lawsuit against the merger.
  8. FCC Chairman statement on the T-Mobile/ Sprint transaction (May 20) is here.
  9. Full transcript of the joint town hall meeting held on the Sprint campus in October 2018 (article from Fierce Wireless).
  10. Great 13-minute July 26 CNBC interview of Marcelo Claure (Sprint Exec Chairman) is here.
  11. Great website from Spectrum Omega where you can see spectrum band by geography by carrier.